Frequently Asked Questions

Visiting Us

Generally, your first appointment with the surgeon will involve an evaluation that takes into account your medical history, current complaints and an examination of the injured area. On occasion, X-rays are required and can be taken the same day. In some cases, other tests will be recommended. Once authorized, these can be scheduled for a later date.

Any relevant medical information, including diagnostic reports and images, will help us better evaluate your condition. If you have these available as digital files, please bring them with you to your first visit.

Additionally, please bring the following: 

  • Insurance card

  • Photo ID

  • Outside medical records

  • Outside slides with pathology reports

  • Referring physician contact information 

  • Primary care provider contact information

  • Pharmacy contact information


Please plan to arrive at least 15 minutes before your scheduled appointment to allow for the registration and insurance verification process. We understand staying on schedule is important to our patients, and your early arrival helps ensure we can see all our patients in the most timely manner possible.

Insurance policies differ from patient to patient, and coverage will depend on both the procedure and your individual policy. The surgeon’s office will always obtain authorization in advance of any surgical procedure; however, we advise you to speak with your insurance representative to discuss patient responsibility, co-pays and other important coverage details.

If there will be any changes to your insurance coverage before or near your date of surgery, please notify us immediately. Authorization, which can take time, may need to be obtained from your new insurance company. Failure to inform us of these changes could result in a cancellation or postponement of your surgery.

Yes. Generally, there are a number of individuals who can assist you with forms and paperwork. Often, it is best to bring these materials to your surgeon’s office before surgery. Please consult your surgeon for specific instructions. 

Preparing for Surgery

Surgery is an invasive procedure that carries inherent risk. Prior to obtaining written consent, your surgeon will discuss the surgery’s risks, benefits and alternatives. Additionally, any risks related to anesthesia will be addressed by a member of the anesthesia team. Please speak with your surgeon or a member of their team if additional clarification is necessary.

Some patients will be required to obtain medical clearance from their primary care provider prior to surgery. On occasion, patients will require additional clearance from relevant specialists to ensure patient safety. Preoperative testing—like blood work, electrocardiograms (EKGs), urine tests and chest X-rays—may also be necessary. Preparing for surgery is, to some extent, personalized and will depend on the procedure being performed as well as your medical condition. Your surgeon will direct you further in advance of surgery.

Please do not eat or drink after midnight on the evening before your surgery. Consuming food or liquids prior to anesthesia can be dangerous and, due to safety concerns, may result in the postponement or cancellation of your procedure. If you have been instructed to take certain home medications on the morning of surgery, it is safe and allowed to do so with a sip of water. Pediatric patients may be allowed to have clear liquids, such as water, up to three hours prior to surgery. Milk and other non-clear liquids cannot be consumed after midnight on the evening before surgery. Please speak with your surgeon or a member of their team if additional clarification is necessary.

It depends. There are medications that need to be continued the morning of surgery and there are medications that must be discontinued. Prior to surgery, our nurses will advise which medications you should or should not take before your procedure. Please speak with your surgeon or a member of their team if additional clarification is necessary. 

If you have digital files of your preoperative imaging, please bring them with you on the day of surgery. It is also helpful to bring a list of medications you are currently taking. We also recommend you bring something to read or occupy yourself with while you wait. For your own safety, we require that a friend or family member accompany you home following the surgery.

Yes. Please leave any jewelry, watches or other valuables at home for safekeeping. Although cell phones and clothing are kept in locked storage during surgery, we strongly recommend against bringing valuables and other non-essentials with you.

Yes. Please leave any jewelry, watches or other valuables at home for safekeeping. Although cell phones and clothing are kept in locked storage during surgery, we strongly recommend against bringing valuables and other non-essentials to the hospital.

Montefiore has three main surgical sites. The location of surgery will vary from patient to patient, depending on the type of surgery being performed. Prior to surgery, your surgeon’s office will provide you with specific instructions on where to go and when to arrive.

Generally, patients are required to check in 1.5 to 2 hours prior to surgery. The night before surgery, our staff will call to inform you what time to arrive. If surgery is scheduled for a Monday, you will be called the Friday before surgery. If surgery is scheduled following a national holiday, you will be called on the last day the hospital is open before your surgery. If you do not receive a call by 4:00 p.m. on that day, you should contact either your surgeon’s office or the Ambulatory Care Registration at 929-263-3477 as directed.

After Your Surgery

Post-operative hospital stays vary from patient to patient and are dependent upon the procedure performed as well as other variables. Your surgeon will discuss the anticipated post-operative management plan that is most appropriate for you.

In many cases, pain medication is helpful following surgery; however, it is not always necessary. If medication is required, your surgeon will provide you with a prescription. As most prescriptions are electronically submitted directly to the pharmacy, you will be asked to provide your surgeon’s office with your pharmacy’s contact information in advance.

Post-operative care varies from patient to patient, and specific instructions are dependent upon the procedure performed as well as other variables. Generally, showers are permitted in the early post-operative period, but your surgeon will likely instruct you to keep the wound clean and dry. Please speak with your surgeon or a member of their team if additional clarification is necessary.

Physical therapy and rehabilitation are frequently ordered after surgery to help maximize a patient’s functional outcomes. Your need for physical therapy or rehabilitation depends largely on the procedure performed and the nature of your condition. Please speak with your surgeon or a member of their team if additional clarification is necessary.

Post-operative care and follow-up visits vary from patient to patient and are dependent upon the procedure performed as well as other variables. Your post-operative appointment will be arranged either prior to surgery or upon discharge. Please speak with your surgeon or a member of their team if additional clarification is necessary. 

Follow-up appointments are dependent on the nature of your condition and the treatment provided. Please consult your surgeon for more specific details.

Doctors are not able to “clear” patients for driving. This is a decision that must be made by patients when they feel safe and capable. Driving while using narcotic medications is dangerous and should not be attempted under any circumstance. Additionally, we recommend patients refrain from driving if they are experiencing any substantial discomfort that could result in or contribute to an accident. While there is no specific law against driving with a dressing or a cast, we strongly discourage it. Your safety and the safety of others are of paramount importance.

Return to work varies from patient to patient and is dependent on a host of patient-specific factors. Additionally, return to work also depends on the type of work that you do and the type of surgery you are having.