The Montefiore Approach

The Shoulder Division at Montefiore brings together a tremendous breadth of expertise to treat a wide range of disorders affecting the shoulder and shoulder girdle. Our faculty possesses a wealth of clinical experience and knowledge, providing every patient with specialized and individualized attention.

Our fellowship-trained surgeons work closely with experts in non-operative specialties like rehabilitation medicine, physical and occupational therapy, rheumatology, musculoskeletal radiology, and pain management to offer patients the most comprehensive and innovative treatment options available.

As an academic medical center, we are constantly engaged in discovering and exploring new innovations in the field. Our participation in biomechanical and clinical research allows us to investigate novel approaches and treatments for the advancement of care within our own health system and beyond.

  • Our Patient-Centered Care

    The experience of our patients and their loved ones—not simply their ailments—demands our full attention. Your dedicated care team will be there to discuss your condition, answer questions, assess treatment options, and develop a treatment strategy that is best for you.

  • Our Expertise

    Disorders of the shoulder and shoulder girdle represent some of the most common and debilitating orthopaedic conditions. These injuries and conditions can cause significant pain and dysfunction, interfering with work, recreation, and everyday life.

    At Montefiore, we believe that optimal outcomes are the product of thorough evaluations, accurate diagnoses, and intelligent patient-specific treatment plans developed through years of clinical experience and evidence-based medicine.

    Using a collaborative approach, our operative and non-operative specialists work together to assess and customize a patient-specific treatment plan.

  • Our Dedication to Research

    As an academic medical center, we are deeply committed to advancing the science of medicine. Together with our Albert Einstein College of Medicine, one of the highest NIH-funded institutions in the country, we work towards excellence in shoulder study and care. Our Multidisciplinary Shoulder Research Group, comprised of clinicians, basic scientists, coordinators, and other researchers, is dedicated to unveiling the causes of pain and discovering innovative ways to improve clinical outcomes. We routinely participate in multi-center research studies and publish our results in peer-reviewed medical journals.

Conditions We Treat

Montefiore treats a vast spectrum of conditions, a selection of which you will find listed below. In addition to these, we have experience treating many other conditions. Please contact us today to schedule a consultation so that we can review and discuss your specific healthcare needs.

Some Common Conditions

  • Multi-directional laxity
  • Traumatic shoulder dislocation
  • Superior labral tear
  • Rotator cuff disease (bursitis)
  • Rotator cuff tear
  • Biceps tenosynovitis
  • Proximal humerus fracture
  • Scapula fracture
  • Clavicle fracture
  • Acromioclavicular joint injuries (shoulder separation)
  • Shoulder arthritis
  • Humerus fracture/non-union

Our Treatments

While most shoulder and shoulder girdle injuries can be effectively treated with non-surgical intervention, in some instances, surgery represents the most effective solution. Our team offers patients a wide spectrum of cutting-edge surgical techniques, including arthroscopy, fracture fixation, and total shoulder replacement. For those seeking further information, we have included a few examples of common procedures that we perform at Montefiore.

Highlighted Treatments

  • Arthroscopic Instability Repair

    While physiotherapy can sometimes help restore stability and strength, in some instances surgery is required. Arthroscopic instability repair is a minimally invasive surgical technique that uses a camera to diagnose and, in some cases, treat the cause of instability or recurrent dislocations.

    Arthroscopic instability repair aims to restore shoulder stability by tightening and repairing the injured anatomic structures. By working through several small incisions, the stretched capsule can be reduced in size, and the torn labrum can be reattached to the bone using sutures and small anchors.

    The patient can often return home the day of surgery either in a sling or a brace. Following surgery, physical therapy is frequently necessary to help patients regain flexibility.

  • Open Instability Repair (Latarjet Procedure)

    Instability of the shoulder commonly occurs following traumatic dislocation. Left untreated, instability and/or recurrent dislocations may lead to further disability. Physiotherapy can sometimes help restore stability and strength; however, in some instances, surgery is required. Open instability repair is a conventional surgical technique used to treat instability or recurrent dislocations.

    An open instability repair aims to restore shoulder stability by tightening and repairing the injured shoulder capsule and its associated structures, including the labrum. It can also be used to reconstruct bone loss that may result from recurrent dislocations.

    The patient can often return home the day of surgery, either in a sling or a brace. Following surgery, physical therapy is frequently necessary to help patients regain flexibility and strength.

  • Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    Rotator cuff injuries involve either partial or complete tears of specific tendons within the shoulder joint. These injuries are extremely common and can range in severity. They can occur after a traumatic event, such as a fall, but sometimes develop over time without an isolated incident. They routinely result in pain, decreased strength, and decreased range of motion. While physiotherapy can sometimes help restore strength and motion, in some instances surgery is required.

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is a minimally invasive surgical technique. Working through several small incisions, a camera and special instruments are inserted into the shoulder. The bone above the rotator cuff is then smoothed and decompressed in order to minimize future injury (acromion). From there, rotator cuff tendons are reattached to their proper location on the humerus using small bone anchors and specialized sutures.

    The patient can often return home the day of surgery either in a sling or a brace. Following surgery, physical therapy is frequently necessary to help patients regain range of motion and strength.

  • Total Shoulder Replacement

    The shoulder is a ball-and-socket joint. As people age, the cartilage can wear out, resulting in arthritis. Sometimes shoulder arthritis can develop for other reasons, such as rheumatoid arthritis, avascular necrosis, or following a trauma. Regardless, this may result in pain and limited motion, which can greatly impact an individual’s quality of life. If non-surgical treatments do not provide enough pain relief, the joint can be replaced surgically. A total shoulder replacement involves replacing the damaged parts of the shoulder joint with a specialized prosthesis made of durable artificial materials.

    There are a number of shoulder replacement systems available, including conventional, reverse, and revision. A conventional shoulder replacement is often used when surrounding muscles and tendons are intact and healthy. A reverse total shoulder replacement is often selected for patients with chronic rotator cuff tears, something common in older patients with complex fractures and concurrent arthritis. Revision shoulder systems, which allow for more complicated reconstruction, are utilized in the case of a failed prior shoulder replacement.

    Total shoulder replacement generally requires a short hospital stay. Physical therapy is typically needed to help patients regain range of motion and strength. The goal of total shoulder replacement is to relieve pain, improve function, and allow patients to return to their daily activities.

  • Open Reduction and Internal Fixation of Shoulder Girdle Fractures

    Shoulder fractures are common injuries following trauma and can lead to significant pain and disability. Although they can be commonly treated non-operatively, there are instances when surgery is needed.

    Open reduction and internal fixation is a surgical procedure that involves aligning and positioning the fractured bone or bones. Thereafter, metal plates and screws are used to fix and maintain proper position during the healing process. Specialized locking plates, sterilized bone graft, and surgical grade bone cement are utilized in select cases as needed, providing a full complement of tools and techniques useful in cases of poor bone quality.

    Open reduction and internal fixation may require a short hospital stay and will be determined on a case-by-case basis. Physical therapy is typically needed to help patients regain range of motion and strength. The goal of open reduction and internal fixation is to alleviate pain, restore function, and help patients return to their daily activities.